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Notices for Thursday, November 15 (2:30 p.m. update):

  • The Farmers Market is open until 6 p.m.
  • All programs, classes and events are canceled.
  • The Arts Barn, Casey Community Center, Aquatic Center, Community Museum, Benjamin Gaither Center, Youth Centers and the Kentlands Mansion are closed.
  • The Activity Center will close at 5:30 p.m.
  • Today's recycling collection is suspended. The contractor will collect today's scheduled recycling areas this Saturday, 11/17/18. 

 

Prescription Medication Disposal

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The Gaithersburg Police Department is now accepting unused or expired prescription medications at its police station all year round. Unused or expired prescription medications are a public safety issue that can lead to accidental poisoning, overdose and abuse. In fact, prescription and over-the-counter drugs are, after marijuana and alcohol, the most commonly abused substances by Americans 14 years and older. In an effort to stop these from occurring, the police department provides an opportunity for citizens to dispose of unwanted medications safely and securely throughout the year.

The Prescription Drop Box is located in the Police Station lobby at 14 Fulks Corner Avenue. Citizens may stop by seven days a week between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. to drop off unwanted and expired medications and keep them away from those at risk of abusing them. The drop box accepts solid pharmaceuticals such as pills, capsules, patches, and pet medications. It cannot accept syringes or liquids. This service is completely anonymous.

National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day

On Saturday, October 27, 2018, the Police Department will give residents an opportunity to prevent prescription drug abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs. Bring your unused medications for disposal to the Police Station between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. on October 27. No liquids or syringes will be accepted. The service is free, anonymous, and there will be no questions asked.

The Drug Take-Back initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Medicines that languish in home cabinets are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicines—flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash—both pose potential safety and health hazards to our water supply.